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later, edward snowden began releasing revelations about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security and why we feel we need to put measures in place. we are then going to turn to what are the increased risks of mass collection of data on the public? finally, what are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no random
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the first time the president is promising to limit the nsa's extraordinary reach saying what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. that likely means not spying on foreign leaders who happen to be good friends and allies. across europe, an uproar today. the u.s. ambassador to spain under siege. called on the carpet to explain reports that the nsa was vacuuming up telephone data, tracking 60 million calls in spain in less than a month according to el mundo. germany today called for an investigation into nsa's tapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. the interior minister said the chancellor
, edward snowden manifest tow of truth is what he is calling it. he is ghademanding the u.s. dro espionage charges against him and why he is suggesting he is is not criminal. >>> a bizarre security breach at o'hare airport. an alligator on the loose in terminal 3! what? wait, wait, wait... no, no, no, wait, wait. (baby crying) so you can deposit a check... with the touch of a finger. so you can arrange a transfer in the blink of an eye. so you can help make a bond... i got it. that lasts a lifetime. the chase mobile app. so you can. ♪ hey lady! noooo! no! [ tires screech ] ♪ nooo! nooo! nooo! hey lady, that's diesel! i know. ♪ ♪ okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash.
bombing reminded us that terrorism is still an ex existentialnd threats. a month later, edward snowden revelationsing about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security and why we feel we need to put measures in place. we are then going to turn to what are the increased risks of mass collection of data on the public? are the what implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. ofserves as an overarching the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. al jazeera, washington. >> a british man has been arrested and charged with hacking in to the computer systems of several federal agencies including nasa and the u.s. army. 28-year-old lovie love was arrested last friday at his home northeast of london he was invited in new jersey where he used a serve tore carry out the attacks. love also faces charges related to attacks in virginia it cost the government millions of dollars. >> jersey hayes begun in to the hacking scandal that brought down the news of the world in 2011. eight people, including two of the papers former editors are now on trial. rory has more now from london. >> reporter: the defendants arrived on time for their trial but the storms that hit the u.k. southeast overnight meant that not everyone could be so prompt. proceedings got underway maybe three hours late. no matter, this is likely to be one of the u.k.s longest trials in years. t
, ever since edward snowden exposed them. calls to rein them in grew louder when it was revealed the u.s. was eavesdropping not only on enemies, but allies. on capitol hill two of america's top intelligence officials made an impassioned defense and here's homeland security correspondent bob orr. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence today confirmed the n.s.a. has long spied on friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapologetic. >> some of this reminds me a lot of classic movie
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
obtained from edward snowden showed the agency breck into yahoo and google data centers around the world. >>> all right. your high school seniors are probably pulling their hair out over these college applications. the problems with common apps. >>> you've already heard this, students in school, send money. we'll explain how you can send it easier than ever using email. >> that's great.   >>> all right. college application time also known as one of the most stressful times of the year for seniors amount tool used by seniors and accepted by universities is supposed to make it easier. >> the common app is online only and it is plagued with problems. how current students are coping with those deadlines approaching fast. >> reporter: the most stressful part of getting to these beautiful campuses is this -- the dreaded application process. it's a ritual so fraught with anxiety that it has become a national thing. for this year's crop of high school seniors, there's more anxiety than usual. the process is plagued by glitches like delayed applications. the common application was dined to let
edward snowden. also the best and worst places in the world to grow old. we'll take a look at where seniors are struggling - ahead. ed d . >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with the headlines tonight. charges have been filed against a suspect in the lax shooting that killed a t.s.a. officer. if convicted 23-year-old paul ciancia could face the death penalty. authorities say he left a note at the scene. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. in the employe employees, addressing them staying that he want to instill fear in their minds. >> healthcare.gov is down for maintenance - the website used to enrol in the insurance program and will be offline until 9am sunday morning. pakistan's wanted man was buried. taliban chief hakimullah mehsud was killed by a u.s. drone yesterday. supporters have threatened suicide bombings in revenge. hakimullah mehsud's death has pakistani politicians concerned about the future of peace talks with the taliban. we have more from peshawar. >> this is seen as a blow to the taliban pakistan, which may have a struggle
resident, edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports from wjz -- for wjz, from washington, d.c. >> reporter: a del delegation of diplomats arrived. >> i think we have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor, edward snowden, leaked documents, revealing that the u.s. tapped german chancellor angla merkel's private cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst james louis said the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the info
is not letting up. all is coming from one-time resident edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports for wjz from washington. >> reporter: a delegation from european diplomats hope to limit u.s. spying on their leaders. >> i think i have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor edward snowden released documents that revealed that the u.s. had tapped german canc lor angela merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst, james louis says the u.s
can abuse the power that has been given to them. that includes rogue actors. edward snowden did not do what the government expected. in los angeles there was the public disorder and intelligence division that compiled information and used it for political purposes. information that is collected for law enforcement and security purposes is often used on political groups. >> if i could provide some perspective. the fbi operates through mandates that are codified in statute laws written by our congress and signed by the president into law. that process has produced, appropriately and necessarily, oversight, not just in the executive branch of government itself. the department of justice is obviously in the fbi as well. but also with the congress and through the court system and the judicial branch. that is to make sure that they and and day out, the work we are doing -- day in and day out, the work we are doing is representing the people of the united states and is what is required at that point in time. they have an expectation that we use those tools. they have an equal expectation that
. about a month later, edward snowden began releasing real elevations about massive surveillance. in this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. and as you've heard from greg, it's our mission to try to improve the quality of public policy decision making which is an important discussion to be had. that's why we brought together the panel. people have different views. while everyone here has deep expertise in experience with part of it. we're hoping to have ab open discussion about it. in will be some thing they'll be unable to question. unable to an and just because of the situation. but we're going try to guide the discussion over a few topics today. we're going to start can with try to understand what works in intelligence and security. why do we feel we need to put it in place. we're going turn to what are the increased risk of mass collection of information on the public. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
, that includes many that showed over the weekend protesting the nsa and some supporting edward snowden here. this has broadened out and one of the big questions remains today, what information was provided to the president, particularly adds it relates to spying on our allies in the collection of data in that form. >> we don't know what kind of information the administration has. we heard them say they didn't have that information. dianne feinstein wasn't aware of the program. that is an interesting question. either way, it presents problems for the administration if they did know about it, why was that continued to allowed to go forward. if it didn't know about it, why is it oversight of these programs. >> let me play what adam schiff said. >> absolutely believe that the program in its current form for end and be restructured because we can get all of the same information to protect the country that we need to without getting this wealth of data. and all programs should be constitutional, effective and should be structured in a way to minimize any unnecessary intrusion on our privacy. >> w
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
. >> jeff: and does edward snowden come up, the fact that more leaks are going to come out come up. >> i think it does. and i think will you see it on a couple of levels, jeff, number one glenn greenwald from the "guardian" is already tweeting that another large country is going to learn that it was the subject of u.s. surveillance tomorrow. so the shoes keep dropping. >> jeff: yup. >> but i also think that there's going to be a reach out to people that we have worked with that may not be public knowledge that they cooperated with it, and those countries are going to be told this may be disclosed and could be compromised as well as people we may have listened in on to say look, this is going to come out too. and here it is in contact and let's try and move on. so this is a gift that keeps on giving and giving. >> jeff: john miller, thank you very much. a reminder you can see john's interview have with former deputy director of the cia mike morell on "60 minutes" at 7:00 p.m., 6:00, central. tuesday marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. today new jersey governor chris christie
information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing cooperation and the dragnet surveillance of citizens, if not the monitoring of leaders' phone calls. >> that delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, political and business. >> we have reports that there'll be more talks on spying held in europe. >> tens of millions of twitter users around the world are expressing their thoughts in 140 characters or less. many want to the crackdown on the growing hate speech on the social media platform. we have this story. >> twitter is becoming a favourite spot for tech-savvy hate monningers. that's according to a report by a center in international human rights. the center gave twitter an f grade when it came to policing the hate messages on its fight. >> facebook was the best to deal with issues. twitter was the worst. we. the
on and talk about edward snowden. does he consider himself a hero as supporters do. how does he react to the anger of those who call him a traitor? >> i think he is disappointed. he doesn't consider himself a hero. i think he eschews any such label. i think he considers himself a patriot and an american and a whistleblower. and i think that's right. obviously all sorts of incendiary and inflammatory words have been thrown around, some of which don't even fit the legal definition, if people were to bother to look it up. but, no, he didn't see himself as a hero. >> one of the people attending the rally, a man named dave miller, told u.s.a. today, the national progress is more control, more power. no matter what they say, we're going down the path towardteri ttierney? do you agree? >> i think we are in the position of turnkey tierney. we are right there. we are following the playbook. >> how has it hurt anybody? >> how has it hurt anybody? the fact that all of our personal information is being stored in a big data storage facility in utah, anybody at any time who works for the nsa or any
that more information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation and the dragnetting of that i have citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. >>> president of the philippines is questioning the authenticity of a video that appears to show hostages being shot at by the army during a siege last month. now fighting between the philippine army and the hostage takers left many dead in the southern city there. in just a moment we'll be getting the military's reaction, but first here more details. >> reporter: the maker of that online video says it shows hostages shouting at the army not to shoot. they are waving the white flag of vendor. nearby, carrying weapons are said to be national liberation front rebels. the military is believed to have opened fire. some fall while others scamper for safety. he is no stranger to armed conflict. he fought as a soldier against the mlmf which they first independents at the end of the 9060s, now the very same fighters were the ones that held him hostage. >> we are so happy because we thought a cease
based on the information leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. reports deny that president obama knew that nsa was spying on angela merkel. >>> news executives are in a london courtroom charged with tackinhacking phones and bribing officials. the trial is expected to run through spring. >>> there is a new glitch playing the affordable healthcare website. the data hub is down halting online enrollment. that hub went down on sunday. it's key in determining eligibility for tax credits which can reduce the cost of those monthly insurance problems. the problem was caused with a connectivity issue at a center operated by verizon. those are your headlines. consider this i"consider this" e have news 24 hours a day at www.aljazeera.com. fought by antibiotics. is it too late to catch up and infections. >> a look at america's conspiracy theories with brad melt zer. did bobby kennedy take his brother's brain and how long was the fbi tracking lee harvey oswald before the assassination. >> wing suit flying is a deadly sport. mountains. >> i'm antonio mora, welcome to "consider this." we
by edward snowden in spain in the last couple of days in france in germany, has been of such a proportion and scale that that was not expected, and the spying on leaders has been of such a length of time and invasiveness that that was not expected. so it's about scale and proportionality as well. yes, people expect spying. yes friend-on-friend spying is not entirely unexpected, we're not naive. but friend on friend spying of this degree, by citizens around the world by the nsa allegedly is something that needs to be investigated. this is not just a human rights issue, this has commercial implications. if plas data has been taken on this scale and encryption has been compromised that is a commercial issue. we are asking number one, that we get to the truth because we can't -- you have to reestablish trust between the eu and u.s. on this. this is important. secondly we're saying get some proportionality into this. we need to begin a process that says look we're not expecting some admission tomorrow but let's start a process of accountability. we have a problem in the european union. we have
sun light into the process, none would have been known if not for edward snowden, who was treated as a trader, but reason is because of the revelations he came out with. neil: and has yet it come out with, matt welch thank you. >> thank you, neil. neil: what do you want for holiday this year? we asked our twitter followers, what do they want from santa. one wants a playstation 4. and an xbox 1. he is 48 years old, i don't know, and another one, a new playstation 4, and galaxy nexus 5 start phone, why the high-tech wish list could give us all headaches. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better
you think about edward snowden? is he a genuine whistle-blower, a traitor, a bit of both? >> in effect, i think that -- well, a legitimate whistle-blower is one who is the curator of the information that they're distributing. i didn't feel that that was the case with manning. and i don't think that that is the case with snowden. i did feel that was the case with daniel ellsburgh. i think that we will find forgiveness in our justice system and in our hearts when somebody has called foul on crimes -- by our government against our people. or against other governments or people. but what has become a kind -- the whistle-blower term is being associated with a blitz of information, based on the kind of -- the narcissism of the so-called whistle-blower. has there been a lot of good stuff that came out of the wikileaks? yes, it did. did we know that many people whose lives were put in jeopardy for that, people who fight very hard for this country? yes, we do. and certainly, diplomacy has fallen under enormous attack. so i encourage the whistle-blower who sees that the constitution of our count
operates outside of the country. >> this move comes after nsa leaker edward snowden indicated the u.s. was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel and 34 other foreign leaders. dozens of pages of top secret u.s. documents were declassified on monday. in an parent bid to show the nsa was acting legally when it gathered millions of americans phone record. >>> the obama administration is granting a six-week extension to americans who want to sign. for obama care coverage. the new deadline is march 13st and extended because the website has a number of problems. we are told the website is back up and running now. >>> when it comes to terrorism the future looks frightening. cnn obtaining a sobering new report that reveals casualty and attacks are on the rise. as chris lawrence reports, there is no end in sight to that troubling trend. >> reporter: it's not your imagination. terrorists are launching more attacks like this deadly assault on a nairobi mall. and it's likely the world will see even more violence next year. cnn obtained exclusive access to an upcoming report from stark
of the national security agency which as you know are under fire since the revelation by former nsa analyst edward snowden that revealed documents that showed that they had been listen together phone conversation or scooping up the phone numbers of conversation of american citizens. the director of national intelligence said that the information was gathered legally, and the content is only available to a handful of people. >> everything that we do on this program is audited 100%. on the business records. 100%. the da data is kept separate frm all the other data we have. it's important to understand that the leaker did not have access to this data period. >> so randall, are these hearings setting the stage for the usa freedom act, and if so what would that legislation mean? what would it entail? >> reporter: well, yes, indeed. the hearings are setting the stage for the freedom act. the freedom act would be an amendment of the patriot okay, and what it would not do is restrict the power of the nsa to gather intelligence but plays some new rules. for example, it would end the "dragnet" collection of
to it, especially not the leaker edward snowden. the former analyst who made public so much top secret information that caused this whole controversial in the first place. the speaker you just heard was congressman peter king. he was talking about one of the suggestions being made by the committee to reform the way the nation gathers intelligence. to modify, to amend, the patriot act, so that there will be some restrictions put into place on how the information is gathering. for example, they are saying that they no longer will have a dragnet collection of phone calls. that there will be stronger restrictions on who is targeted, and there will also be a new position placed on the super secret court to protect rights and inspector general and in a privacy advocate. those are the measures that some members of the committee want to take, but some members of the committee say that they are not necessary, because our agencies are doing a great job keeping america safe. >> okay, so randall, how has the white house responded to these allegations of spying on world leaders. >> well, the white
of revelations by former nsa analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the nsa has been collecting phone calls and text mess inls of millions of citizens. congressman james sensesenbrenner, the author of the "the patriot act" is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, stopping dragnet collection of phone calls from citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is tarted and appoint an advocate to the courts protecting rights. the director of national intelligence, james clapper, and national security director keith alexander told the committee the content of phone calls was secret in a lock box, unless there is a link to terrorism. and that, they say, is rare. >> there would only be looked at if we had reasonable and artic u la ble suspicious that we had connection to a foreign, al qaeda-related group, and look into the box. in 2012 we had 2088 such selectors, that we could look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing there was relatively little discussion about allegations that the u.s. spied on america's allies. at the white
. word from edward snowden that the u.s. has eavesdropped on frenchmen, even on angela merkel's cell phone. a furious merkel called president obama to complain. >> the president spoke to angela merkel, reassured her that the president is not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> reporter: but the white house did not deny that it had happened. >> is not monitoring, will not monitor. i think you're missing a tense there. you've got your president progressive there, you got your simple future, but you're missing your past progressive. >> reporter: the secretary of state has been putting out fires here, there and everywhere. especially over u.s. policy toward syria. after two years of war and the assad regime's chemical attack killing more than a thousand civilians, including children, the saudis accused president obama of backing down, even helping assad butcher his own people. >> the shameful way that the world community accepts the impunity of the butcher of syria is a blot on the conscience of the world. >> reporter: furious that the u.s. did not carry out its thre
classified information from ex-nsa employee edward snowden. added if they don't stop doing so "it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act." bret. >> james, thank you. >>> answers are still hard to come by in the investigation into last fall's benghazi terror assault. last night one of journalisms heavy hitter confirms what we knew and had reported on. correspondent add day housely has the latest from los angeles. >> reporter: it's been more than a year since the attacks on benghazi and still information provided by the state department, military, cia and the white house has been incomplete, contradictory and fails to answer many questions. >> a lot of responsibility, a lot of ownous that needs to be taken up and accounted for. >> reporter: but accounts have been tough to come by. as witnesses claim they've been threatened and in some cases forced to sign nondisclosure agreements. fox spoke last may with an american special operator who witnessed the attack. >> i don't blame -- you know, it's something that's a risky especially in our profession to say an
harvesting those phone calls. edward snowden has not only gotten in the middle of the united states versus the rest of the world, he's gotten in between the governments and their own spy agencies, which is perhaps one reason why the article is saying, let's not worry too much about this. let's move onto the -- >> nothing to see here. >> let's move onto the economic discussion. we don't want to get too deep in the weeds. >> you would need a greyhound depot for the buses that people are trapped under. dianne feinstein, a muscular proponent of expensive surveillance and has repeatedly carried water for two administrations to expand the surveillance laws is furious apparently by her own statements primarily because she was out of the loop. she like the president reportedly out of the loop. the nsa out of the loop compared to obviously some of their targets. the only loop that seems to work here is at the nsa itself, where you have 25,000 employees working on a bunch of important security stuff and a bunch of other stuff, which if you believe the president, is nonessential. and is not part of o
, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor edward snowden leaked documents revealing the u.s. tapped german chancellor awningle -- angella merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying, u.s. intelligence gather suggest under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department james lewis says the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the information is too valuable. >> this makes us safer. less surveillance means less successful successful -- more successful attacks. >> reporter: danielle nottingham, wjz eyewitness news. >> some u.s. lawmakers are defending the spying practices. they argue places like france are safer because of the n
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. host: kevin on twitter asks -- guest: you're caller earlier talked about the boston bo
known about it. lawmakers say new leaks from edward snowden about the u.s. intercepting phone calls from other officials are really hurting relations. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we have listened in. so i think we have repair work to do. bill: brazil's president canceled a state visit over nsa leaks that indicated her phone calls had been listened to. bill? bill: what is the white house going to respond to or how will it respond now to these leaks, wendell? >> reporter: as they dribble out piece by piece it is really hurting things. the president has ordered a review to try to balance security needs with privacy concerns. the same technology that allows the nsa to listen to al qaeda communication, allows it to track diplomats calls. it helps them most global communications are routed through the u.s. the president says essentially everybody does this. the some anger we're hearing at foreign leaders
. with wicki leaks and edward snowden spilling our beans every day what's happening on the exchanges is the best-kept secret in washington, d.c. the national security agency could learn something from secretary sebelius. today i will ask consent to approve a six-page bill i introduced yesterday to require the the administration to answer these questions every week. secretary sebelius is not responsible for enacting obamacare, but she has been responsible for three and a half years for implementing it. now many americans have only a few weeks to purchase new insurance or be without health insurance. to expect the secretary to correct in a few weeks what she's not been able to do in three and a half years is unrealistic. mr. president, it's time for the president to ask the secretary of health and human services to resign. i thank the president and i yield the floor. mr. hatch: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from utah. mr. hatch: during debate over debt limit increase in 2009 -- 2006, then-senator obama stated that -- quote -- "the fact that we are here today to deba
as a liquor edward snowden is missing home. with the details in his latest appeal to u.s. officials. >>anny: welcome back. a scare at birmingham alabama's international airport just two days after the deadly shooting at lax is calling into question airport's security. how safe are you at an airport? do americans deck there's a get the nation's airports for granted? cnn's a shelby lynne explains why they shouldn't. >>: sunday afternoon off authorities evacuated the airport over a bomb threat. police say someone found a note containing a spread prompted the evacuation. it cost for cancellation of a dozen flights. birmingham police sergeant says a search at the airport turned up nothing. >>: big inconvenience to everyone involved. visitors officers. employees. >>: and may have been a big employee but the incident comes just two days after the shooting and lax. >>: it's very difficult to stop these types of attacks. anyone can show up as we saw in the navy yard with a shotgun. in this case with a semi-automatic and you know it's like a shopping mall outside the perimeter it's almost like an ope
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